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Egypt looks to receive additional 1000 MRAP vehicles from the U.S.

Posted by Dylan Malyasov on


The Government of Egypt has requested an additional 1000 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles and associated equipment, according to U.S. Army Security Assistance Command.

Since the September 2015, Egypt already has received almost 1000 heavily armored MRAP vehicles under the U.S. Department of Defense’s Excess Defense Articles grant program, in which the vehicles are transferred at no-cost to the Government of Egypt.

A final shipment of 101 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles has completed a foreign military sales case to transfer 930 MRAP vehicles to Egypt using the Excess Defense Articles Grant Program.

Under the grant program, the MRAP vehicles are transferred at no cost to the Egyptian government. Egypt is responsible for arranging shipment of the EDA MRAPs from Sierra Army Depot in California to Egypt.

MRAP refers to U.S. military light tactical vehicles that are designed specifically to withstand improvised explosive device attacks and ambushes. Excess defense articles are materiel that is no longer in the Army’s inventory and allows approved countries to request the materiel through the foreign military sales process.

According to Security Assistance Command Country Program Manager Shawn Arrance, these vehicles will be used by Egypt to fight against terrorism and are part of a broad range of military cooperation initiatives between the two countries.

The sale also supports U.S. national interest and continues to enhance Egyptian army capabilities by increasing the readiness posture of the country to defend its national sovereignty and regional stability, he said.

After arrival in Alexandria, Egypt, in May, the MRAP vehicles were loaded onto trains to be taken to a military workshop in Cairo for refurbishment.

USASAC personnel worked with the Egyptian government and the Tank Automotive and Armament Command Security Assistance Management Directorate to fill the request for 930 MRAP vehicles that was approved in 2015.

The transfer includes M1232 RG33L, M1233RG33L HAGA, M1237 RG33 Plus, M1220 Caiman, and M1230 Caiman Plus vehicles, as well as MRAP Recovery Vehicles. Training is included in the package and is ongoing and scheduled in accordance with the Egyptian land forces needs and requests.

Since the initial case back in September 2015, Egypt has submitted another Letter of Request, which initiates an FMS case, for an additional 1,000 MRAPs, Arrance said.

“USASAC and TACOM SAMD are working case development for an additional 700 MRAPs that have been identified and another 300 remaining to be selected,” he said. “We anticipate offering the case to Egypt in November.” 

Egypt will then need to accept the offer to finalize the agreement for the additional 1,000 vehicles.

The total case value for the 2,000 MRAPs is estimated to be $120 million.

“The MRAPs serve as the most appropriate way of satisfying legitimate Egyptian forces’ requirements and priorities,” Arrance said. “Similar items have been previously provided to Egypt under the EDA program.” 

“It has been a successful program and the good story the U.S. Embassy and the Office of Military Cooperation in Cairo is using as a great example of U.S. and Egypt security cooperation,” said Mohamed Mawari, chief of the MRAP Program Office for TACOM SAMD. “We have a great relationship and partnership with all stakeholders, OMC, USASAC, contractors (ManTech International), TACOM-SAMD and the Egyptian land forces.”

USASAC’s continued assistance around the world improves the security and readiness of a major non-NATO ally, which has consistently been an important force for the political stability and economic progress in Africa and the Middle East.

The Army is committed to strengthening ties to its allies and attracting new partners to amass the greatest possible strength for the long-term advancement of mutual interests and deter aggression.

Interoperability is key to the Army vision; and the military-to-military relationship with Egypt that has endured over several decades continues to support that vision.

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