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Raytheon gets $37 million SM-6 and SM-2 missiles contract modification

Posted by Dylan Malyasov on


Raytheon Missile Systems has received a $37 million contract modification for SM-6 and SM-2 missiles.

In a statement made Monday, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) has announced that Raytheon Missile Systems is being awarded a $37 million modification to previously-awarded contract N00024-18-C-5407 for procurement of fiscal 2019 U.S. Navy Standard missile SM-2 and Standard missile SM-6 intermediate-level repair and maintenance.

Also, DoD added that all work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona (88 percent); Camden, Arkansas (11 percent); and Huntsville, Alabama (1 percent), and is expected to be completed by November 2019.

The SM-2 is the world’s premier fleet-area air defense weapon, providing superior anti-air warfare and limited anti-surface warfare capability against today’s advanced anti-ship missiles and aircraft out to 90 nautical miles and an altitude of 65,000 feet. The SM-2™ missile is an integral part of layered defense that protects the world’s important naval assets and gives warfighters a greater reach in the battlespace.

The SM-2 missile has extensive area- and self-defense flight test history with more than 2,700 successful flight tests from domestic and international ships.

As for SM-6, this is an advanced long-range air-intercept missile that designed for extended range anti-air warfare (ER-AAW) purposes providing capability against fixed and rotary-wing aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and anti-ship cruise missiles in flight, both over sea and land. It can also be used as a high speed anti-ship missile.

Deployed on cruisers and destroyers, the SM-6 missile currently provides the U.S. Navy fleet with air defense against fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles and land-attack, anti-ship cruise missiles in flight.

The SM-6 missile combines the Standard Missile airframe and propulsion elements with the advanced signal processing and guidance control capabilities of Raytheon’s AMRAAM air-to-air missile.

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