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U.S. Air Force B-2 bombers train with British F-35 jets for the first time

Posted by Dylan Malyasov on


U.S. Air Force B-2 Spirit bombers conducted interoperability training with Royal Air Force F-35 fighter jets, in the first-ever non-U.S. F-35 integration with the B-2.

For the first time, UK F-35 Lightning jets have been conducted integration flying training with the B-2 Spirit stealth bombers of the United States Air Force as part of their deployment to RAF Fairford in Gloucestershire, UK.

This training demonstrates U.S. support to NATO and underscores U.S. commitment to deterring adversary aggression toward allies and partners. It also enhances the U.S.’s ability to integrate bombers with fifth-generation fighter aircraft like the F-35.

The B-2 bombers, part of the Bomber Task Force currently deployed to the U.S. European Command area of responsibility, are from the 509th Bomb Wing, Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. The aircraft arrived in theater on Aug. 27 and are temporarily operating out of RAF Fairford. The deployment of strategic bombers to the U.K. helps exercise RAF Fairford as U.S. Air Forces in Europe’s forward operating location for bombers.

Strategic bomber missions like this sharpen readiness and the ability to respond to any potential crisis or challenge across the globe.

“Our Royal Air Force friends are integral to the 509th Bomb Wing mission,” Lt. Col. Rob Schoeneberg, Bomber Task Force commander, 393rd Expeditionary Squadron said. “The beauty of our partnerships is that we get to understand how they see the world. Working alongside international fifth generation aircraft provides unique training opportunities for us, bolsters our integration capabilities, and showcases the commitment we have to our NATO alliance.”

British Minister for the Armed Forces, Mark Lancaster said: “NATO is the bedrock of Euro-Atlantic defense, and those secure foundations continue to be reinforced by the training exercises being completed between the Royal Air Force and our special friends in the US Air Force.”

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