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U.S. Air Force prepares for 2020 Atlantic hurricane season

Posted by Dylan Malyasov on


The members of the Air Force who make up the Hurricane Hunters departed on their first storm tasking of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season to investigate an area for possible development into a tropical depression or storm near the Bahamas.

The Air Force’s Hurricane Hunters are expected to fly into Invest 90L throughout the weekend to provide weather data by satellite communication to the National Hurricane Center in Miami to improve their computer models that forecast movement and intensity, said Lt. Col. Anthony Wilmot, 53rd WRS director of operations.

According to the NHC, there is a 70 percent chance that this area of interest could form into Tropical Storm Arthur over the weekend. This would be the sixth consecutive year with a named storm in May.

“Mother Nature doesn’t operate on a calendar, so this is a reminder to always be prepared,” said Col. Jeffrey A. Van Dootingh, 403rd Wing commander. “On that note, the 53rd WRS is prepared, ready and able to meet these storm taskings to provide valuable information to the NHC which can help save lives and property.”

The Hurricane Hunters are conducting an investigation mission today. A low-level invest mission is flown at 500 to 1,500 feet to determine if there is a closed circulation, and if there is a closed circulation they begin flying fix missions into the system, said Wilmot.

Once a system becomes a tropical storm or hurricane, the Hurricane Hunters begin flying at higher altitudes, ranging from 5,000 to 10,000 feet depending on the severity of the storm. Aircrews fly through the eye of a storm four to six times per mission to locate the low-pressure center and circulation of the storm. During each pass through the center, they release a dropsondes, which collect pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed on its descent to the ocean surface.

During the invest and storm flights, the aircrews transmit weather data collected form the dropsondes and aircraft sensors, via satellite communication every 10 minutes to the NHC to assist them with their forecasts and storm warnings.

Forecasters have projected this hurricane season to be more active than usual; however, whether it’s a busy or slow season, it only takes one devastating storm to make it a bad year for a community, so it’s important to be prepared, said the wing commander.

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