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U.S. Navy’s new “flying water vehicle” completely revealed in video leak

Posted by Dylan Malyasov on


The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division recently released a new video showing a compilation of the Navy’s new “Forged by the Sea” commercial and NSWC Carderock Division footage.

A video was posted to the NSWCCD’s channel on Youtube and showed for the first time the new “flying water vehicle” designed for the special operations.

The video drew the attention of military blogger, which noticed the footage of the new Navy’s high-speed surface craft that was developed by the Carderock engineers and scientists.

To be more precise, the new “flying water vehicle” is nothing short than a hydrofoil. As a hydrofoil craft gains speed, the hydrofoils lift the boat’s hull out of the water, decreasing drag and allowing greater speeds.

The new Navy’s high-speed surface craft equipped with hydrofoils that it would use to literally rise above the surface of the waves.

Some source reported that new hydrofoil was created to surpass the tough requirements of U.S. special operations forces and this is the first prototype of a new family of composite and steals assault high-speed surface craft designed for the special operations.

Unfortunately, the Naval Surface Warfare Center does not provide any details.

For reference, the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division is the principal Navy resource, national focal point and international leader in surface and undersea vehicle science, ship systems and related maritime technology. A major technical component of the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Division is a source of innovative technology for other national priorities such as environment, energy and transportation.

The Division is responsible for research, development, test and evaluation, fleet support, in-service engineering for surface and undersea vehicles, associated hull, machinery and electrical systems and propulsors. It conducts logistics research and development, as well as provides support to the Maritime Administration and the maritime industry.

U.S. Navy’s new “flying water vehicle” completely revealed in video leak

Posted by Dylan Malyasov on


The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division recently released a new video showing a compilation of the Navy’s new “Forged by the Sea” commercial and NSWC Carderock Division footage.

A video was posted to the NSWCCD’s channel on Youtube and showed for the first time the new “flying water vehicle” designed for the special operations.

The video drew the attention of military blogger, which noticed the footage of the new Navy’s high-speed surface craft that was developed by the Carderock engineers and scientists.

To be more precise, the new “flying water vehicle” is nothing short than a hydrofoil. As a hydrofoil craft gains speed, the hydrofoils lift the boat’s hull out of the water, decreasing drag and allowing greater speeds.

The new Navy’s high-speed surface craft equipped with hydrofoils that it would use to literally rise above the surface of the waves.

Some source reported that new hydrofoil was created to surpass the tough requirements of U.S. special operations forces and this is the first prototype of a new family of composite and steals assault high-speed surface craft designed for the special operations.

Unfortunately, the Naval Surface Warfare Center does not provide any details.

For reference, the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division is the principal Navy resource, national focal point and international leader in surface and undersea vehicle science, ship systems and related maritime technology. A major technical component of the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Division is a source of innovative technology for other national priorities such as environment, energy and transportation.

The Division is responsible for research, development, test and evaluation, fleet support, in-service engineering for surface and undersea vehicles, associated hull, machinery and electrical systems and propulsors. It conducts logistics research and development, as well as provides support to the Maritime Administration and the maritime industry.

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