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A Triangular Strategy For The Mid East

Posted by Ram Yavne on


The United States can reduce its Middle Eastern footprint and secure its vital regional interests.

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Aid To Israel Isn’t Foreign Aid; It’s An Investment

Posted by Yoram Ettinger on


Israel faces increasingly tight restrictions on its Foreign Military Financing from the U.S., as Breaking D readers know. In the past, when the US provided Israeli with grants under the Foreign Military Financing (FMF) program, Israel could convert 25 percent of the aid from dollars into shekels to buy Israeli products and support local R&D. The… Keep reading →

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Raytheon Touts Aircraft Cyber Protection; Jordan Signs Deal

Posted by Colin Clark on


Raytheon has developed cyber tools to warn pilots and maintainers if their systems have been compromised and to find vulnerabilities. The company announced a contract today here to provide Jordan with cybersecurity for the planes that fly the royal family,

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US Must Bolster Its Presence In MidEast As ISIS Falls

Posted by Michael Makovsky on


As ISIS goes down to military defeat, the United States requires a longer-range plan and an enduring force presence to deny Iran total victory in Syria. Otherwise, the United States risks losing influence as a new Middle Eastern order is being forged. The last ISIS-occupied towns in Syria and Iraq fell recently, but not to… Keep reading →

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State’s New Armed Drone Policy Confuses Ends With Means

Posted by David Deptula on


The intent behind the State Department’s new international policy for armed drones is admirable in principle but the declaration’s hoped-for real-world effect will fall short for three reasons. First, the combat effects of drones can be achieved through a variety of military means. Second, Remotely Piloted Aircraft (as the Air Force calls them) are tools whose use is guided by policy… Keep reading →

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An Anti-Daesh Strategy, One With A Chance Of Success

Posted by Daniel L. Davis on


The current U.S. strategy to destroy the Islamic State (Daesh) is ineffective and is unlikely to succeed. To be successful, the new strategy must be affordable, offer the legitimate hope for an acceptable outcome, and come to resolution within a reasonable timeframe. This new approach would be coordinated with regional allies and have three objectives: Contain… Keep reading →

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Carter Strongly Objects To House NDAA; Norway To Send Troops Against Daesh

Posted by Colin Clark on


 STUTTGART, GERMANY: In a last minute-announcement before his meeting with 10 anti-Daesh coalition members, Defense Secretary Ash Carter told reporters that Norway has made a “very significant” pledge to contribute to the fight. He also hinted that American troop commitments would increase in the future. “Norway’s decision to deploy special operations forces to Jordan to… Keep reading →

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Arab Spring To Paris Fall: A Strategic Shift in the Works

Posted by Robbin Laird on


President Francois Hollande of France arrives Tuesday in Washington for talks with President Obama. Top of the list will be how much America is willing to commit to destroying Daesh, the terrorist group we used to call ISIL. Robbin Laird, Ed Timperlake and Harald Malmgren explore in detail what America’s options are, what France wants and… Keep reading →

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4,817 Targets: How Six Months Of Airstrikes Have Hurt ISIL (Or Not)

Posted by Sydney J. Freedberg Jr. on


[UPDATED with McCain comment] The war is escalating. But what have six months of airstrikes against the self-proclaimed Islamic State actually achieved so far? Last week, Jordan launched its retaliation against the Islamic State for burning a Jordanian pilot alive. Yesterday, we learned ISIL had murdered hostage Kayla Mueller. This morning, President Obama formally proposed a… Keep reading →

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Carter’s Confirmation Hug: SASC Shows He May Be A Strong SecDef

Posted by Sydney J. Freedberg Jr. on


WASHINGTON: Nomination hearings are never just about the nominee. But today’s Senate lovefest for Ash Carter was remarkably dominated by two men who weren’t in the room: President Obama — in whose defense Carter was actually pretty tepid — and King Abdullah II of Jordan. The Obama White House has simultaneously “micromanag[ed]” the military and… Keep reading →

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